When Famous went Funny

LeaghtPeople that are famous in various spheres of life are also human, like us. They also surely had fun in their days. Here is a collection of funny stories of some famous people like Leo Tolstoy, Mozart and even Tiger Woods, the best golfer. Let’s have a look to their stories! Leo Tolstoy –
practical pacifism
Tolstoy was a great pacifist and was once lecturing on the need to be nonresistant and nonviolent towards all creatures. Someone in the audience responded by asking what should be done if one was attacked in the woods by a tiger. Tolstoy responded, “Do the best you can. It doesn’t happen very often.”

Franklin Delano Roosevelt and tedious small talk
Roosevelt was often bored by the tedious small talk that was required of him at social functions. He often felt as if those with whom he conversed were seldom paying attention to what was said. To prove his point, sometimes Roosevelt would begin a conversation by saying, “I murdered my grandmother this morning.” Often these words were met with polite approval. On one occasion, however, an attentive listener gave the witty reply, “I’m sure she had it coming to her.”

It’s tennis to me!
Pop sensation Christina Aguilera was once introduced to the uncrowned king of golf, Tiger Woods. “Christina, I love your music,” Woods declared. “I have all your CDs…” “Sorry, I don’t follow tennis,” Aguilera said, “so I don’t know much about you.”

You’re no Mozart
Mozart was once approached by a young man who was interested in Mozart’s advice on how to compose a symphony. Since he was still very young, Mozart recommended that he start by composing ballads. Surprised, the young man responded, “But you wrote symphonies when you were only ten years old.” “But I didn’t have to ask how,” countered Mozart.

A Small Step for Neil Armstrong
Once, while having lunch with photographer Yousuf Karsh and his wife, Armstrong inquired about the many countries the couple had visited. Surprised, Mrs, Karsh replied, “But Mr. Armstrong, you’ve walked on the moon. We want to hear about your travels.”
“But that’s the only place I’ve ever been”, responded Armstrong apologetically.

Sir Walter Scott –  the stupid boy
Sir Walter Scott, when a boy, gave very slight indications of genius, nor did he shine in his early career as a scholar. In Latin, he did not advance far until his tenth year, when Dr. Paterson succeeded to the school at Musselburgh, where young Scott then was. Dr. Blair, on a visit to Musselburgh, soon after Dr. Paterson took charge of the school, accompanied by some friends, examined several of the pupils, and paid particular attention to young Scott. Dr. Pater- son thought it was the youth’s stupidity that engaged the doctor’s notice, and said, ” My predecessor tells me, that boy has the thickest skull in the school.”—”May be so,” replied Dr. Blair, “hut through that thick scull I can discern many bright rays of future genius.” How fully the prediction has been verified, need not be told.

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